Octapharma Plasma, Inc.

Donate Blood Plasma

Frequently asked Questions

What is Plasma?
What compensation will I receive for my plasma donation?
Who donates plasma?
What type of medical screening and testing is done?
How often can I donate plasma?
How long does it take to donate plasma?
How is the plasma removed?
What is plasmapheresis?
How much plasma is needed?
Can I get AIDS from donating plasma?

What is Plasma?

The blood is made up of three main components:

  1. Red blood cells
  2. White blood cells
  3. Plasma

Plasma is the liquid portion of the blood that serves as a carrier for the red and white cells. It is made up mostly of water and dissolved proteins including antibodies and clotting factors.

What compensation will I receive for my plasma donation?
Every donor receives compensation for the time they take to donate. We appreciate your commitment and the time and effort you make to donate for us and want to compensate you for that. Compensation information is available at your local plasma donation center.
Who donates plasma?
Anyone at least 18 years of age and who weighs at least 110 pounds can donate plasma. All individuals who donate plasma must pass a brief medical examination, extensive medical history screening, and testing for infectious diseases.
What type of medical screening and testing is done?
To ensure the safety of the plasma every donation is tested for hepatitis and the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). Periodic tests are performed to test for syphilis. To ensure your safety every time you visit the center your blood level (hematocrit) and protein will be tested along with your blood pressure, pulse, and temperature.
How often can I donate plasma?
You can safely donate twice per week. FDA permits two donations within a 7 day period, with at least 48 hours in between the donations. The body replaces the donated plasma usually within 24 to 48 hours. All donors are encouraged to drink large amounts of water after your donations to help the body replace the fluid lost through donations.
How long does it take to donate plasma?
The first visit is longer due to the medical exam and answering extensive medical questions. This visit can take about one to two hours. Routine plasmapheresis visits usually take about 45 minutes to an hour.
How is the plasma removed?
Donating plasma is similar to donating blood. A needle is placed in an arm vein and blood goes through special plasmapheresis equipment. The medical instrument separates your plasma from your red blood cells. Your red blood cells are returned to you using the same needle. Any and all material that comes into contact with your blood during plasmapheresis is sterile and single-use.
What is plasmapheresis?
Plasmapheresis is the process of removing whole blood and separating red blood cells from plasma using a specialized, sterile piece of medical equipment. The red blood cells are then returned to you and the plasma is retained for use in producing medical therapies. There is a single use sterile set up package used for each donor, which is discarded after each donation. The plasmapheresis procedure and all of Octapharma’s plasma donation centers are approved by the FDA.
How much plasma is needed?
Worldwide, the total demand for plasma by fractionators (pharmaceutical companies who further manufacture human plasma into life-saving therapies) exceeds 20 million liters. One donation is about half to three quarters of a liter. Hundreds, if not thousands of donations of plasma are needed every year to provide therapy for each patient.
Can I get AIDS from donating plasma?
No. Plasma donations are made in a highly controlled, sterile environment by professionally trained staff. All plasma collection equipment is sterilized and equipment that comes in contact with a donor's blood or plasma is used only once, eliminating the possibility of transmitting any viral infection.

Find nearest Plasma Donation Center

Become a plasma donor

Testimonials

“I like donating plasma for Octapharma. I have been donating for almost one year. The staff is nice and helpful. I feel that my donation is helping improve the lives of others.”

Sandy J., Las Vegas

“I started donating blood plasma fifteen years ago. My aunt lost several babies due to her blood’s Rh factor. And I decided it was my duty to help other women with this problem through their pregnancy. I get paid for my donations, but I think it’s my duty to do what I can to help other women not lose their unborn babies.”

Lisa W., Salt Lake City

How you can help

Copyright © 2009–2014 Octapharma Plasma, Inc. | Privacy Statement | Terms of Use | Employee Portal